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HONG KONG

Seen The Unseen

Hong Kong is one of the most vibrant and dynamic cities in the world. Not only does it offer a metropolitan lifestyle and countless skyscrapers, but beautiful landscapes, beaches and places to escape city life. We believe that “the other side” of Hong Kong is best seen on the water from the deck of a beautiful yacht.

Double Haven

Rising sea levels 6,000–8,000 years ago submerged the river valleys in Double Haven, leading to the formation of indented shorelines with headlands and bays. But the mountains in the area were mostly formed some 160 million years ago, when lava mixed with volcanic ash formed rock strata. Later, rivers flowed down from high mountains and washed sand and stones to coastal lowlands, forming reddish sedimentary rock about 500 metres thick. Popular landforms here include Hung Shek Mun, Camp Cove and Double Island.

TAP MUN

Off the Northeastern corner of the Sai Kung Peninsula is Tap Mun or Grass Island. Its English name provides a hint to its terrain. This is an easy hike with relatively gentle inclines and lots of open grassy slopes for kids to run around and play, with the occasional wandering cow to keep them interested (watch your step for cowpats). The entire island is well-marked with signposts, so don’t worry if your map reading skills are lacking.

Text: https://hongkongliving.com/

NAM FUNG WAN

Only accessible via boat or hike, Millionaire’s Beach (Nam Fung Wan) is a popular spot for many junk parties. Located in Sai Kung Country Park, the area holds freshwater lagoons and hidden coves, perfect for snorkelling. This beach can get quite crowded during the summer months with loud music and junk swapping, great for those looking to party. In the bay over from the beach you’ll find the popular seafood spot Yau Ley.

Text: https://hongkongliving.com/

BLUFF ISLAND

The Ung Kong Group consists of Bluff Island, Wang Chau and Basalt Island. The forces of sea and wind have helped develop numerous steep cliffs and sea arches on the southeast coast of the islands, including the 30-metre-high sea arch at Wang Chau, the 45-metre-high sea arch at Basalt Island, and the Tiu Chung Arch at Jin Island.

BASALT BAY

The Ung Kong Group consists of Bluff Island, Wang Chau and Basalt Island. The forces of sea and wind have helped develop numerous steep cliffs and sea arches on the southeast coast of the islands, including the 30-metre-high sea arch at Wang Chau, the 45-metre-high sea arch at Basalt Island, and the Tiu Chung Arch at Jin Island.

CLEAR WATER BAY

Clearwater Bay First Beach and Clearwater Bay Second Beach are separated by a short stretch of rocky coast and interconnecting footpath. First Beach is the smaller and more secluded of the two; the sand is coarser with some shingle. Second Beach offers finer sands and the waters are also protected by shark prevention nets.

CENTRAL PEIR 10

There is no attraction in Hong Kong that is more iconic than the skyline of Victoria Harbour. In fact, one can say that the harbour was the very birthplace of the city itself. The deep waters between Hong Kong Island and the Kowloon Peninsula are why a collection of fishing villages grew to become an international centre of trade. Today, the harbour is still the city’s throbbing heart and its iconic skyline is also one of the world’s most stunning urban landscapes. With such a skyline, it deserves to been seen at more than one angle.

REPULSE BAY

Despite the name, Repulse Bay Beach is the glitziest of Hong Kong’s beaches, boasting an idyllic, palm-fringed swathe of sand and shallow waters ideal for family frolics. It has great facilities, with changing rooms and showers, and a beach-front mall The Pulse, housing breezy diners Limewood, Classified and Tai Sip Song, as well as a seasonal weekend sunset beach club and plenty of smart lifestyle and children’s boutiques.

LAMMA ISLAND

Alight at Sok Kwu Wan Pier and you’re met with views of rolling, green hills and a multitude of low-rises — there is a three-storey height restriction — with colourful awnings. Breezy alfresco restaurants suspended overwater line the walkway, with tank after tank of live seafood. Venture inland and you’ll soon encounter residents walking their dogs or riding bicycles — there are no cars — along the narrow paths, hikers visiting for the weekend eager to explore the verdant trails, and beach-goers barbecuing up a storm on Hung Shing Yeh Beach on the island’s west. It’s this kind of laid-back island living that keeps tourists and locals alike coming back.

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